Monday, August 27, 2012

"5 reasons people unfollow you on Twitter"...plus one

Hey,

So this one's a bit of a quickie.

Came across this article from 8/10/12 shared at the National Arts Marketing Project FB page, 5 reasons people unfollow you on Twitter. It begins with:
1. Every tweet is about your product or service. 
"Exciting news! Version 5.3 just released!" "Check out our brand-new feature!" If every single tweet is about something your company is doing, I'm not going to follow you. I get flooded with enough marketing in the rest of my life.
I definitely recommend checking out the article for the other four.

I had to add the following:
Thank you for sharing this!! I would add (as it relates to #1) that not following back is another reason. Maybe not as common, but personally, when I reached my follower limit, the orgs I didn't unfollow were the ones who had reciprocated this simple SM gesture, as it showed that they were interested in engaging with me and not just broadcasting to me. 
I wonder how much of that comes from Twitter being treated like Facebook, and a new follower is thought of simply as a new like, when there's a different method of engagement and orgs have the ability to follow back on Twitter, where they don't have the opportunity to like back on Facebook.
So that's my take on things. I understand that people want to curate their Twitter stream, but that's what lists are for. The pros of following others back, providing they're non Real Estate agents, porn bots, or belong to Team #FollowBack (amongst other savory characters on twitter), seem to outweigh the cons.

Plus, like I mention, if and when people reach their following limit, my simple litmus test of who stays or who goes is simply who follows me back and who doesn't. And friendorfollow.com makes it really easy to figure out who one's fans are (which tweeps are following you that you aren't following back).

Something to consider when doing a social media audit. But this coupled with #1 from the link at the top would probably be my biggest quibble with many arts organizations on Twitter.

What do you think? Are you with an arts org that doesn't follow back most of its followers? Why not? If you do, why do you? How much of what you tweet is about the org? If you do tweet about other things, what do you tweet about?

And all these ultimately beg the question, what are you and your arts organization's goals on Twitter?

Because if engagement is one of them, then reciprocating follows and diversifying your content are things you should strongly consider doing, if you're not already,

- JR
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